Hair loss is a common concern affecting millions of people worldwide. Whether it’s thinning, receding hairlines, or bald patches, the impact of hair loss on one’s confidence and self-esteem can be substantial.

What is Hair Loss?

Hair loss, medically known as alopecia, is a condition characterised by the partial or complete absence of hair from areas where it normally grows. This phenomenon can manifest in various forms, from gradual thinning to sudden, significant hair shedding. Understanding the different causes of hair loss is crucial for devising suitable prevention and treatment plans.

Causes and Risk Factors of Hair Loss

The causes of hair loss can be multifaceted, ranging from genetics and hormonal changes to lifestyle and nutritional deficiencies. Among the plethora of factors contributing to hair loss, micronutrient deficiency plays a significant role. Some of the causes are:

  • Micronutrient deficiency

  • Hashimotos

  • Hypothyroidism

  • PCOS

  • Post viral stress

  • Stressful event

  • Protein deficiency

  • Malabsorption

  • Malnutrition

  • Medications

  • Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

A comprehensive understanding of these causative factors helps in adopting targeted approaches for preventing and managing hair loss effectively.

Vitamins and Minerals Important for Hair Growth

Recent studies shed light on the critical role of vitamins and minerals in hair health. Micronutrients like vitamin A, vitamin B complex, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, iron, selenium, and zinc play pivotal roles in the normal hair follicle cycle and immune cell function. Deficiencies in these micronutrients can potentially contribute to hair loss.

The Study: ‘The Role of Vitamins and Minerals in Hair Loss: A Review

A study conducted to explore the link between micronutrients and non-scarring alopecia emphasises the significance of proper nutrition in maintaining healthy hair. The review discusses the roles of various vitamins and minerals in the hair cycle, highlighting their importance in both development and immune defense mechanisms. The findings suggest that addressing micronutrient deficiencies could be a modifiable risk factor for preventing and treating hair loss.

References:

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13555-018-0278-6

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0738081X21000729

https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/lap.2020.0468

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5315033/

 

Dhal with crispy sweet potato and coconut chutney

Looking for a healthy, hearty Indian dish for dinner? This is a great winter warmer that everyone will love.

SERVES 4

Ingredients


FOR THE SWEET POTATOES

  • 2 sweet potatoes, skins on, washed and roughly chopped into 1.5cm cubes
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • olive oil or organic ghee

FOR THE DHAL

  • 2 cloves of garlic, peeled and chopped
  • a thumb-size piece of fresh ginger, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 1 green chilli, finely chopped
  • 1 red onion, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 200g red lentils
  • 1 × 400ml tin of coconut milk
  • 400ml vegetable stock
  • 2 large handfuls of spinach
  • a bunch of fresh coriander, roughly chopped, stalks and all
  • juice of 1 lemon

FOR THE COCONUT CHUTNEY

  • 50g unsweetened desiccated coconut
  • 1 teaspoon black mustard seeds
  • 10 curry leaves
  • a little coconut oil
  • a 20g piece of fresh ginger, grated
  • 1 red chilli, finely chopped

Methods

1. Preheat your oven to 220°C/fan 200°C/gas 7.

2. Pour 150ml of boiling water over the coconut and leave to soak. Put your sweet potatoes on a roasting tray and add a good pinch of salt and pepper, the cumin and fennel seeds and a drizzle of olive oil. Roast in the oven for 20–25 minutes, until soft and sweet in the middle and crispy brown on the outside. In a large saucepan, sizzle the garlic, ginger, chilli and red onion in a little oil for about 10 minutes, until soft and sweet.

3. Grind the cumin and coriander seeds in a pestle and mortar, then add to the pan with the other spices and cook for a couple of minutes to toast and release the oils. Add the lentils, coconut milk and stock to the pan and bring to a simmer, then turn the heat down and bubble away for 25–30 minutes.

4. While that is cooking make your chutney. Drain the coconut and put it into a bowl. Fry the mustard seeds and curry leaves in a little oil until they begin to crackle, then pour the mixture over the coconut. Season with salt and pepper, then stir in the ginger and chilli and give it a good mix.

5. To finish your dhal, take it off the heat, then stir in the spinach and allow it to wilt a little, stirring in half the chopped coriander and the lemon juice too. Pile into bowls and top with the crispy sweet potatoes, spoonfuls of the coconut chutney and the remaining coriander. This can be served with seasonal greens and some fluffed brown basmati rice too.

Enjoy!

Credits

Recipe sourced from Anna Jones – A Modern Way to Eat

Image sourced from www.annajones.co.uk/recipe/harrods-dhal-crispy-sweet-potato-quick-coconut-chutney

AUTOIMMUNITY – Stop the body’s attack on itself!

Autoimmunity or autoimmune conditions, relate to diseases (of which there are more than 80), where the immune system is attacking the body’s own healthy tissues and cells. This insult on the body by the immune system could be localized, to a specific organ or it could be systemic, effecting various parts of the body. This can change the way an organ or body systems functions and can cause damage and inflammation, resulting in many different symptoms.

Book Your First Consultation

Looking for More Information?

Natural Health Medicine is here to help. Give us a call to book a consultation today.

08 8332-2271

10 Days to Feeling Better

Try the #1 strategy that has helped our clients with fatigue, weight issues, and generally feeling crappy to feel better in just 10 minutes a day!